Plymouth Ship and Aircraft Wrecks A to Z

For references used in this list please see the bottom of the page.

HM Submarine A7 (1914) ...

Aagtekerke (1721) ...

Location Description Plymouth
Reference NMR
Craft type East Indiaman
Date built  
Date of loss  
Manner of loss Wrecked
Outcome Abandoned
Construction Wood
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port  
Destination port  
Hull length  
Hull beam  
Hull draft  
Hull displacement  
Cargo  
Armament  
Crew  
Built  
Master  
Owner  

Abelard (1916) ...

Abraham Newland (1801)

Location Description Plymouth Hoe
Reference NMR 877185
Craft type Schooner (3)
Date of loss 10th December 1801
Manner of loss Foundered
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port Lisbon
Destination port Topsham, Exeter
Cargo Wine, Fruit (Oranges)
Crew 5 (2)
Master Capt. Morgan

The Schooner Abraham Newland of Portsmouth was wrecked on the rocks under the Hoe, during the storms that battered Plymouth between the 9th and 10th of December 1801. The vessel had been carrying a cargo of wine and fruit, from Lisbon, bound for Topsham. She broke free of her moorings before daybreak of Thursday the 10th, going ashore near Lane's Hill in the East Hoe. Four of the crew made it ashore before the vessel went completely to pieces. The mate, however, was not so fortunate, he was last seen in the companion way of the vessel imploring for help, before a wave overwhelmed him (2). His body washed up on shore the following saturday, clad in only his shirt and trousers, as if in an attempt to swim to shore, on inquest the coroner deemed him 'drowned by shipwreck' (3).

The cargo of wine was mostly lost, save for 5 casks, the rest dashed to pieces on the rocks. The remaing cargo, of oranges, was left floating and attempts were made to recover them despite being of little value. One salvager attempting to collect oranges near the rocks was washed off and nearly drowned. When he was brought to shore little signs of life were present, but as medical assistance was immediately procured 'he was again restored to life'(1).

(1)"PLYMOUTH—Dec. 9." Caledonian Mercury, Edinburgh, Scotland, 14 Dec 1801, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(2)"Wednesday's and Thursday's Posts." Trewman's Exeter Flying Post, Exeter, England, 17 Dec. 1801, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(3)"DREADFUL STORMS AT SEA, [ill]." Hull Packet, Hull, England, 22 Dec. 1801, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Agenoria (1869)

Location Description Plymouth
Reference NMR
Craft type Smack
Date built 1858
Date of loss 1869
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Built Padstow

English smack, built in Padstow 1858.

Agenoria (1901)

Location Description Plymouth
Reference NMR 106775
Craft type Dredger
Date of loss 1901
Manner of loss Wrecked
Crew 2
Master S W Willing

Vessel was stranded and lost in wind conditions S force 7, while dredging in Plymouth Sound (1).

(1) Parliamentary papers, Vol 92, Page(s) 147, 1902, Board of Trade Casualty Returns, Appx C.

Agnes (1890)

Location Description Plymouth
Reference NMR 1066995
Craft type Fishing boat
Date of loss 1890
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Master J Masters, Turnchapel
Owner J Masters, Turnchapel

This fishing vessel, was stranded and wrecked in wind conditions W force 10, while at her moorings (A).

Ajax (1854) ...

Albion (1833)

Location Description Stoke Point
Reference NMR 1060233
Date of loss 22nd December 1833
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port Leith
Destination port Lisbon
Cargo Herring, lamp block
Master Garson (3)

The Albion was found wrecked off Stoke Head near Bigbury Bay on the 22nd December 1833 (1). She had been travelling from Leith, bound for Lisbon (2), carrying a cargo of herring and lamp-block. The craft had been rendered unmanageable due a severe gale leading to her being driven on shore, however the master and crew had taken to a lifeboat in which they reached Mothecombe (1).

(1) "PLYMOUTH AND DEVONPORT." Trewman's Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser, Exeter, England, 26 Dec. 1833, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(2) Parliamentary papers, Vol 17, Page(s) 307(687) 1836, Select Committee on Shipwreck, Appendix 7,1833.
(3) "SHIP NEWS." Morning Post, London, England, 30 Dec. 1833
, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Albion (1837) ...

Albion (1877)

Location Description Plymouth Hoe Baths
Reference NMR 1065303
Craft type Schooner
Built 1835, Plymouth
Date of loss 14th October 1877
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Hull displacement 59 tons
Destination Port Charleston, Cornwall
Cargo In Ballast
Master D Davies
Owner D Davies

The Welsh schooner Albion was built in plymouth 1835 and owned by D. Davies of Cardigan. The vessel ended up piled on the rocks beneath the Plymouth Hoe baths, surrounded by three shattered yachts(1). The incident occured on the night of the 14th October 1877, during the storm that also sunk the R.H Jones and Rothesay. She was in ballast while anchored off Drakes Island during the storm, shortly bound to pick up a consignment of china-clay from Charleston, Cornwall. The strong winds of the storm forced the small schooner to drag her anchors and wreck on the rocks beneath the Hoe. The captain and mate were the only crew on board at the time, as it appears that the remaining crew had not returned to the ship as planned in the morning (2).

(1) "THE GALE" Western Mail, Cardiff, Wales, 16 Oct. 1877, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(2) "The Weather" Times, London, England, 17 Oct. 1877 pg 6, The Times Digital Archive

Albion (1839)

1839

Albion (1817)

Location Description Breakwater
Reference NMR 877295
Craft type Smack
Date of loss 18th January 1817
Manner of loss Foundered
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port Southampton
Cargo Bricks, hoops
Master Coose (4)

The smack Albion, mastered by Coose (4)(Case (3) or Close (2)) of Plymouth, coming from Southampton; carrying a cargo of bricks and hoops foundered off the 'back of the Breakwater'(1). The vessel and her crew were lost, after 'a violent gale of wind at about SSW attended with a very high tide was experienced at Plymouth...on Saturday night and Sunday morning' (2). Part of her stern was picked up near the Breakwater (4).

(1) West Briton; 24-Jan-1817
(2) Lloyd's, 1969: Lloyd's List 24-Jan-1817, No 5146
(3) The Morning Post, London, England, Friday, January 24, 1817; Issue 14356, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(4) Royal Cornwall Gazette, Falmouth Packet & Plymouth Journal, Truro, England, Saturday, January 25
, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Alert (1898)

1898

Alfonso (1891)...

Alfred (1813)

Location Description Bovisand Bay
Reference NMR 877274
Craft type Brig
Date of loss 26th January 1813
Manner of loss Foundered
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port Sunderland
Cargo Coal
Master Shields

The collier brig, Alfred, sunk on the 26th January 1813 in Bovisand Bay. She was coming from Sunderland with a 240 ton cargo of coal, bound for Plymouth, she struck a rock near the Mewstone and sunk in 5 fathoms of water. The crew were all saved, but the cargo was lost.(1)

(1) "SHIP NEWS." Morning Chronicle, London, England, 29 Jan, 1813, 19th Century British Library Newspapers

Alice (1901)

Location Description Millbay
Reference NMR 1230241
Craft type Smack
Date of loss 1801
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality United Kingdom
Cargo Rock
Master Weston

Whilst carrying a cargo of dredged rock, was blown from her moorings and wrecked against the outer sea wall of Mill
Bay outer east pier. (A)

Allow Me (1911)

Location Description Penlee Point
Reference Shipwreck Index
Craft type Cutter
Date of loss 19th November 1911
Manner of loss Foundered
Nationality United Kingdom

Foundered/ total loss (A).

Amazon (1936)

Location Description Picklecombe Fort
Reference NMR 1071798
Craft type Ketch
Date of loss 23rd September 1936
Manner of loss Grounded
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port Falmouth

The Amazon, from Falmouth bound for Plymouth, grounded in the night near Picklecombe Fort, during a thick fog. She was refloated later in the morning and taken into the Cattewater by two tugs, for repair, however the vessel was leaking and appeared strained (1).

(1) The Times, London, England, Thursday, Sep 24, 1936; pg. 21; Issue 47488

HMS Amethyst (1811) ...

HMS Amphion (1796) ...

Ann (1839)

Location Description Penlee Point
Reference Shipwreck Index
Craft type Sloop
Date of loss 23rd March 1839
Nationality United Kingdom

The master of the Revenue cutter, the Stork, Andrew Gillespie, was awarded a Silver Medal for his part in the rescue of the four crewman from the Sloop, the Ann, on saturday 23 March 1839 (B).

(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Anna II (1997?)...

Annie (1896)

Location Description Nr Vanguard Buoy
Reference NMR 1067492
Craft type Barge
Built 1871
Date of loss 6th February 1896
Manner of loss Foundered
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port Plymouth
Destination Port Calstock
Cargo Gas Lime
Crew 2
Master R Martin
Owner R Martin Snr

Vessel foundered and lost whilst carrying a cargo of `gas lime', in wind conditions SSW force 3 (A).

Ant (1819)

Location Description Plymouth
Reference Shipwreck Index
Craft type Sailing Vessel
Date of loss 25th September 1819
Nationality United Kingdom

Stranded/ total loss (A). An account in the Morning Post states that the Ann was got off with very little damage and proceeded with her journey (1).

(1)"Ship News." Morning Post, London England, 30 Sept. 1819, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Apollo (1866)

Location Description Plymouth Sound
Reference NMR 1140293
Craft type Brigantine
Date of loss 20th January 1866
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port St. Ives

Stranded/Total Loss (A).

(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Argo (1799)

Location Description Cattewater
Reference NMR 877162
Craft type Snow Brig
Date of loss 23rd September 1799
Manner of loss Grounded
Nationality Sweden
Departure port Barcelona
Cargo Wine
Master Kruse

The Argo was Swedish Snow Brig (snaubrigg) bound from Barcelona with a cargo of wines for the vitualling stores of Plymouth. The vessel was coming into the harbour during a violent gale blowing W.S.W causing her to run onto the rocks near the Bear's head in the Cattewater (2). The main mast was quickly cut away in an attempt at her preservation; allowing her to be got off again after about twenty minutes, but with considerable damage (1). The accident was said to have occured due to the inattention of the pilot (2).

(1)True Briton (1793) London, England, Thursday, September 26, 1799; Issue 2110, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(2)Courier and Evening Gazette,(London, England, Thursday, September 26, 1799; Issue 2216, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Arthur

HMT Asama (1941) ...

Astrea (1725) ...

Augusta of Plymouth (1872)

Location Description Redding Point
Reference NMR 1064782
Craft type Hooker
Date Built 1861
Date of loss 31st August 1872
Manner of loss Collision
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port Plymouth
Cargo Fish (Mackerel)
Crew 4
Master Johns

The Augusta, a small fishing boat from Plymouth was returning to port through the western entrance of the Breakwater when she was struck by the trawl sloop Skimmer of the Sea. It is assumed that the collision occured due to neither vessel carrying lights (3). The Augusta was carrying a catch of Mackerel (1), when inbound she went under the bows of the Skimmer and sank immediately taking two men; William Forster and Richad Easter, with her. The remaining two crew were picked up by a passing boat.

(1)The Dundee Courier & Argus, Dundee, Scotland, Monday, September 02, 1872; Issue 5958, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(2) The Hampshire Advertiser, Southampton, England, Wednesday, September 04, 1872 pg. 4, Issue 2736, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(3) Trewman's Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser,Exeter, England,Wednesday, September 4, 1872; Issue 5623, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Augustine (1861)

Location Description Batten Point
Reference NMR 1060342
Craft type Brig
Date Built 1861
Date of loss 20th February 1861
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality France
Departure port Nantes
Cargo Wheat
Crew 6
Master Joseph Gautier

The French Brig Augustine was wrecked on the rocks of Batten Point during a storm, she was carrying a cargo of Wheat bound for Plymouth (1). The Master, Joseph Gautier, Mate; Etienne Bigot and Seaman; Francois Boré were rescued after a group of Brixham Fisherman heard their cries of distress while rowing up the Cattewater; the men were then taken to the Admiral McBride tavern where they received medical treatment. However the remaining crew, Julien Davis, seaman; Louis Pastieux and a boy named Jullien; on his first passage, were lost after the ship parted from her cables and ended up on the rocks (2).

(1)"Multiple News Items." Royal Cornwall Gazette, Falmouth Packet, and General Advertiser,Truro, England, 22 Feb. 1861 pg8, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(2) Glasgow Herald, Glasgow, Scotland, Saturday, February 23, 1861; Issue 6590, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

HMS Augustus (1801) ...

Aurora (1795)

Location Description Cattewater
Reference NMR 1062447
Craft type Transport
Date of loss 18th February 1795
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port Quiberon

The Aurora, a British transport ship, ran on shore during a storm on the 18th February 1795. The ship had been attempting to get in Sutton Pool after having to cut their cables while anchored in the Sound. She was grounded along with the Sarah, and it was presumed she had broken her keel (1). However despite the damage both vessels managed to get off the following day as the weather abated (2).

(1) Oracle and Public Advertiser (London, England), Saturday, November 21, 1795; Issue 19 170, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(2) Morning Chronicle, London, England, Monday, November 23, 1795; Issue 8140, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Avon (1882)

Location Description Cattewater
Reference NMR 1065987
Craft type Ketch
Date Built 1873
Date of loss 1st November 1882
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality United Kingdom
Builder Morris, Bristol
Crew 5
Master George Bate

This vessel was lying at anchor in the Cattewater, her starboard anchor out with 30 fathoms of chain, when she was overwhelmed by a SW hurricane accompanied by thick fog. She dragged her anchor until she drove shore on the rocks beneath Queen Anne's Battery. A steam tug and pumps were used in an attempt to refloat her, but failed, and she was abandoned as a total loss with a heavy list to starboard.(A)

Baroda (1890)

Location Description The Slimers, Mew Stone
Reference NMR 1067028
Craft type Ketch
Built 1871
Date of loss 10th December 1890
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality United Kingdom
Builder Morris, Bristol
Crew 4
Master W F Chown

"On Wednesday night a deep mist came off the land, and, combined with an atmosphere of intense darkness, made it impossible to distinguish at a distance the lights which pointed the way to Plymouth Harbour" (1)

The Baroda, an English trawler, was lost on the same night as the Nepaul, during a thick fog. Although being described as belonging "to a class of vessels that generally find their way home in all weathers and seas"(1), it would seem that she had elected to follow the Nepaul, assuming her to be on a correct course inside the Breakwater, the result of this being that both vessels ground within 100 yards of each other. The crew remained on board for about an hour before leaving the vessel, they were picked up by a pilot cutter and taken to the Barbican (2).

The Hampshire Advertiser when reporting on the incident, declared that "Plymouth possesses none of the natural advantages which make Southampton pre-eminently a port of safety. It would be practically impossible for such an accident to have occured within a stone's throw of our own port; but at the Western port just one little mishap occurs and a ..... vessel becomes a total wreck"(3). Clearly not letting reporting get in the way of making a point.

(1) "The Accident to the Steamer Nepaul." Times, London, England, 12 Dec.1890 pg5, The Times Digital Archive
(2) "WRECK OF A P. AND O. STEAMER OFF PLYMOUTH." Hampshire Advertiser, Southampton, England, 13 Dec 1890 pg2, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(3) "THE IRISH 'REBELLION'." Hampshire Advertiser, Southampton, England, 13 Dec 1890 pg5. 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Baron (1886)

Location Description Plymouth Sound
Reference NMR 1066296
Craft type Cutter
Date Built 1853
Date of loss 8th September 1886
Manner of loss Foundered
Nationality United Kingdom
Owner J Germain
Crew 4
Master J Germain

According to the Lloyd's agent at Plymouth, the trawlers Baron and Myra collided at 9:30, on the 8th September 1886, within Plymouth Sound. The collision cut the Baron down to the water's edge, sinking immediately; the crew all being saved. (1)

(1) "Multiple News Items." Morning Post, London, England, 9 Sept 1886, pg6 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Baron van Pallandt van Roosendaal (1881)

Location Description Batten Bay
Reference NMR 1065973
Craft type Barque
Date Built 1859
Propulsion Sail
Date of loss 27th November 1881
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality Netherlands
Departure port Moulmein, Myanmar (Burma)
Destination Port Liverpool
Cargo Teak
Owner J van Renswoud, Rotterdam
Crew 13 (14)
Master O D Duintgr

The Dutch Barque Baron Van Pallandt had been making her way from Moulmein (Myanmar) to Liverpool with a valuable cargo of teak (1) and had lain at anchor in Plymouth sound, when she was drive ashore in SW force 10 conditions (A). On the morning of the 27th November 1881 the coastguard at Mount Batten observed the Baron drifting towards Jennycliff Bay and the lifeboat Clemency was sent rescue the crew of the vessel. By this time the vessel was upon the rocks. The Captain refused to quit the ship or allow his men to, until it was found that neither tugs sent to their assistance; the Carron and Vixen, had hawsers long enough to pull them from the rocks. At this point 10 of the crew took to the ship's boat and were picked up by the lifeboat; the captain, chief mate and steward remaining on board, despite the continuing storm (1). They remained on board until low water at which time they landed in their own boat (A).

Contemporary newpapers reported for several days that the Barque was in fact Norwegian (1) this was later corrected when the Lloyd's list of wrecks and casualties was published listing the vessel as Dutch (2).

(1) "Disasters At Sea." Times, London, England, 28 Nov 1881, pg6, The Times Digital Archive
(2) "Latest Shipping Intelligence." Times, London, England, 29 Nov 1881, pg11, The Times Digital Archive
(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Belle (1843)

Location Description Cattewater
Reference NMR 1060262
Craft type Schooner
Propulsion Sail
Date of loss 13th January 1843
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Owner Banks, Plymouth
Master Curtis (1) Avis (A)

On the night of the Thursday 12th January 1843 a wind began to blow hard from the south, continuing to increase during the night reaching what the Plymouth Times described as a "perfect hurricane". Between 3 and 4 the following morning a thunderstorm and torrential rain began, with the wind shifting WNW unabating. As morning came it appeared that all was well in the Sound with the vessels at anchor there, but as the sea began to run 8 vessels were driven on shore (3). Among them was the Plymouth schooner Belle, owned by Mr Banks of Frank's Quay, the Bragila, the Southampton and the General Brock. The Belle went ashore in Deadman's Bay, however she was managed to be got off and taken to the Cattewater sands without any material damage (2).

(1) "Dreadful Hurricane." Times, London, England, 16 Jan. 1843, pg5, The Times Digital Archive
(2) "Multiple News Items." Standard, London, England, 16 Jan 1843, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(3) "THE LATE HURRICANE.-SHIPWRECKS AND LOSS OF LIFE" The Morning Post, London, England,Monday, January 16 1843, pg. 5, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Belle Isle (1761)

Location Description Fowey
Reference NMR 876534
Craft type Victualler
Date of loss 10th October 1761
Manner of loss Wrecked
Departure port Guernsey
Cargo Brandy

`...drove ashore last Sunday at Plymouth, is bulged.'(A).

Betsey (1806)

Location Description Batten Point
Reference NMR 1060195
Date of loss 11th Decemeber 1806
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality American
Departure port New York
Destination port Amsterdam
Cargo Sugar, Indigo, Coffee
Crew 14
Master Doyle

Friday night it blew a tremendous hurricane at SW with a heavy sea in the Sound. All the men
o' war rode out the gale very safe and snug; but the BETSEY, a large American ship from New York to Amsterdam,
laden with sugar, indigo and coffee, that had been detained and sent into this port by the LION privateer of this place,
and was liberated yesterday by an order of the High Court of Admiralty, parted her cables in the Sound during the
height of the storm and went ashore on the rocks between Cobblers Reach and Withy Hedge. She soon fell on her
side and went to pieces. The captain and six men got safe ashore; but a boat with seven men trying to reach the beach
was upset in the breakers, and six were unfortunately drowned. Several trawl boats are hired to try to save the
remains of the cargo, which is estimated worth 20,000l
[sterling] (1).

(1) Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc, Portsmouth England, 22 Dec 1806, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Betsey (1866)

Location Description Plymouth
Reference NMR 1174711
Date of loss 31st October 1866
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port Penzance

Stranded/Total Loss (A).

Blackburn Iris (S238) (1931) ...

Blade of Wheat (1689) ...

Bon Ordre (1799)

Location Description Cattewater
Reference NMR 1062448
Date of loss 11th February 1799
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality France

The Bon Ordre was a french privateer that had been captured by the Navy. The vessel was driven ashore in the Cattewater after a hurricane, she was however refloated and taken to a place of security wihout much damage (1).

(1) Whitehall Evening Post (1770) (London, England), February 21, 1799 - February 23, 1799; Issue 8048, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Bon Pasteur (1884)

Location Description Breakwater
Reference NMR 1066083
Craft Type Lugger
Date of loss 26th January 1884
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality French
Departure port Le Havre
Destination port Bristol
Cargo Phosphate
Crew 4
Master F O Renaud
Owner Masson

The French Ketch Bon Pasteur, bound from Le Havre to Bristol with a cargo of phosphate, was caught in a gale and demasted off the Eddystone (1). Captain Renuad put about with a damaged rudder aiming to enter the sound through the western channel, only to have the vessel driven onto the breakwater and then completely over it (A). The crew managed to save themselves by clinging to a crane at the east end of the breakwater, and were pounded by the sea for three hours. One of the crew was washed off twice, but each time rescued by his comrades. As the tide abated the crew made their way to the Lighthouse and were recieved by the keepers, who fired rockets as signals of distress. They spent the night in the Lighthouse and were taken ashore by a government tug in the morning (1).

(1) The Royal Cornwall Gazette Falmouth Packet, Cornish Weekly News, & General Advertiser,Truro England, Friday, February 01 1884, pg 7; Issue 4201, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Bonaventure (1627)...

Bragila (1843)

Location Description Bovisand Bay
Reference NMR 1060263
Craft type Barque
Propulsion Sail
Date built 1826
Date of loss 13th January 1843
Manner of loss Foundered
Nationality United Kingdom
Master Heale

The Barque Bragila had unloaded a cargo of American timber at Plymouth and had been making her way to her home port of Falmouth on the afternoon of the 12th January 1843, but found herself driven back by the weather. She was attempting to make her way inside the breakwater but her sails had "been blown to rags" attempting to pass the eastern entrance and began drifting towards Bovisand Bay (1).

Mr. W. Walker, the Queen's Harbour Master, observed the situation of the vessel and gave a signal as to which part of the bay to run for. The crew did their best and between 8 and 9 on the Friday morning she ran into the bay. One crew member, attempting affect a landing with a rope was washed against the rocks, fortunately saved by two men going to his assistance. The remaining crew were brought ashore through the efforts of Lt. Cornish R.M who launched a boat carried from Bovisand to the Bay by four of his men (2).

(1) "Multiple News Items." Standard, London, England, 16 Jan 1843, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(2) "THE LATE HURRICANE.-SHIPWRECKS AND LOSS OF LIFE." The Morning Post, London, England,Monday January 16 1843, pg 5, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Brilliant (1762)

Location Description Cattewater
Craft type Frigate
Date of loss 15th January 1762
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom

Lost after SW storm drove several vessels on shore. "The Brilliant, Tartar, and Senegal, main and mizen masts gone" (1). It was reported that other vessels managed to ride out the storm, but the Brilliant ended up safe ashore under the victualling office.

(1) "News" General Evening Post , January 14 - January 16 1762, Issue 4409, Sourced from the British Library

British Tar (1804)

Location Description Cattewater
Reference NMR 1062455
Craft type Brig
Date of loss 20th January 1804
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port Plymouth
Owner Lockyer

`Plymouth, Jan. 21.. On Thursday evening last, and until about 2 o'clock on Friday morning, we experienced here the most awfully tremendous storm that was ever remembered, and in its consequences very fatal to the shipping at this port: the gale was preceded by a bore of the sea, which ran into the harbour with great violence, and rose ten feet, in about as many minutes,after which it [...(damaged letters...] again with such rapidity as to occasion many vesels to break adrift. In the course of the night, scarce a vessel in this port remained at her moorings but were driven against each other, or on the different shores of the harbour...The BRITISH TAR, of this port, a brig belonging to Mr Lockyer, drove from her moorings, and is now sunk in Catwater.'

(1) Tyne Mercury,31 JAN 1804, No 88, Pg 3

(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Briton (1913)

Location Description Mount Batten Bay
Reference NMR 1070187
Craft Type Ketch
Date Built 1895
Date of loss 16th April 1913
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port Plymouth
Cargo Ballast
Crew 4

Stranded/Total Loss (A).

Brothers (1852)

Location Description Mill Bay
Reference NMR 1229225
Craft Type Schooner
Date of loss 27th December 1852
Manner of loss Foundered
Nationality United Kingdom
Cargo Coal

Due a heavy gale that battered Plymouth from 8pm Boxing day to 8 am the next morning, the Brothers, Schooner, of Brixham, broke from her moorings in Millbay and foundered

(1) "Multiple News Items." Morning Post, 29 Dec. 1852, pg 8, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

BW Barge

Unknown

C-293 (1941)

1941

Cabot (1868)

Location Description Batten Reef
Reference NMR 1064440
Craft Type Barque
Date Built 1861
Date of loss 28th December 1868
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality United Kingdom
Destination Port Bristol
Hull length 43.83m
Hull beam 9.39m
Hull draft 5.70m
Hull displacement 597
Built Carmichael, Nova Scotia
Master J Bell (A) Richie (1)

The barque Cabot was lying in the sound, with both anchors down, when the vessel was caught by a WSW gale that struck Plymouth on the night of the 27th December 1868. One anchor parted during the night and the other followed next morning. As she drifted leeward she fouled and carried with her the brig Flying Cloud and the vessels were washed onto Batten Reef. Assistance was quickly rendered to the vessels and the crews were safely removed. The Cabot was later got off and towed into Sutton Harbour. (1).

(1) "DISASTROUS EFFECTS OF THE GALES." Daily News, 29 Dec 1868, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Caesar (1760)

1760

Lifting Camel (ASP)

HMS Captain (1813) ...

Caroline (1809)

Location Description Cattewater
Reference NMR 1062458
Craft Type Brig
Date of loss 17th January 1809
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality France
Departure Port Ile de France (Mauritius)
Cargo Coffee, Peppercorns, Sugar

While lying at anchor in the Cattewater the french Brig Caroline was struck by a passing transport. The fluke of the transport's anchor pierced the bow of the Caroline and she proceeded to sink in deep water. Although efforts were made to weigh her the cargo was thought to be so much damaged that it would have been of little value. The transport, though damaged, remained afloat, but was unable to put out to sea as planned. The Caroline had only been in port a week, taken as a prize from the French by the Eclair Sloop under Lt. Evelyn.

(1) "PORT NEWS." Trewman's Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser, 19 Jan 1809, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Caroline (1853)

Location Description Laira, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060306
Craft Type Sloop
Date Built 1801
Date of loss 1853
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port Plymouth

`A prize vessel which sank at her moorings at Laira.' (A)

Carouse (1796)

1796

Cassandra (1834)

Location Description Near Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060234
Craft Type Sailing Vessel
Date of loss 1834
Manner of loss Foundered
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port Poole
Destination Port Liverpool

Foundered/Total Loss. (A)

Die Frau Metta Catharina von Flensburg (1786) ...

Catharine (1786)

1786

Cato (1828)

Location Description Batten Reef, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060219
Craft Type Transport
Date of loss 12th January 1828
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality United Kingdom
Master Fairweather

The Transport Cato was driven onto the rocks of Batten Bay during a storm; eastward of another vessel, the Haydon. It was initially feared that she would be lost, with the rudder unshipped and damage to the keel (1). They removed casks from the vessel on the 16th of January and on the 17th she had been got off and towed into the Cattewater by the Brunswick Steamer.

(1) "SHIP NEWS." Morning Post, 19 Jan 1828, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Cattewater Wreck (c 1540) ...

Centurion (1689) ...

Chancellor (1934) ...

Charles and Henry (1689) ...

Charles and Mary (1757)

1757

Charles Francis (1900)

Location Description Sutton Harbour, Plymouth
Reference Shipwreck Index (A)
Craft Type Ketch
Date Built 1883
Date of loss 11th December 1900
Manner of loss Scuttled
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port Plymouth
Destination port St Mary's, Isles of Scilly
Cargo Lime
Crew 4
Master C.J Mumford

"Whilst on passage, the cargo of this vessel overheated when 10 miles SSW of Dodman Point, Cornwall. The master turned back for Plymouth, where she was beached and scuttled at Sutton Harbour". (A)

Charlotte (1762)

1762

Charming Sally (1760)

1750

Christiana (1865)

Location Description Plymouth Sound
Reference NMR 1060361
Craft Type Schooner
Date Built 1835
Date of loss January 1865
Manner of loss Foundered
Nationality United Kingdom
Hull beam 4.42m
Hull draft 2.50
Hull displacement 47
Built Douglas, Isle of Man
Master R Quillam

Foundered/Total Loss. (A)

Colonist (1824)

Location Description Teats Hill, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060208
Craft Type Sailing Vessel
Date of loss 22nd November 1824
Manner of loss Stranded
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port London
Destination Port Barbados
Master James Smith

"But we never deemed that it would be our painful duty to record the account of a ruin so vast and afflicting, as occurred on that night and on the morning of Tuesday. The desolation of our shores is of a most melancholy description, nothing but wrecks are to be seen in any direction, and valuable property lies floating about on the water without an owner" (1)

The Colonist was left on shore after a hurricane hit plymouth on the 22nd November 1824. The winds blew at times from WSW to SE and the vessel found itself under Teat's Hill 'dismasted and full of water' (A). It had been bound from London to Barbados with a general cargo, the crew were all saved and by the 8th December the vessel had been got off the rocks at high water and taken into Sutton Pool.

(1) Hampshire Telegraph, 29 Nov 1824, Issue 1312

(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Colosie (1838)

Location Description Raveness Point
Reference NMR
Craft Type Brig
Date Built  
Date of loss 5th December 1838
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality France
Hull beam  
Hull draft  
Hull displacement  
Built  
Departure Port Dunkirk
Destination Port Bordeaux
Crew 6
Master  

 

(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Commerce (1834)

1834

Commerce (1838)

1838

Commerzieweathin Haupt (1865)

Location Description Mount Batten Reef, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060368
Craft Type Brig
Date of loss 24th November 1865
Manner of loss Stranded
Nationality Germany
Departure Port Taganrog
Cargo Wheat
Crew 11
Master Hendrick Peters

During gales that battered Plymouth in November 1865 the Commerzieweathin Haupt, Meckenlberg, under Hendrick Peters, with a cargo of wheat, was attempting to make for shelter. A stranger to the port the Captain at first attempted to run towards Drakes Island, then after going inside the ships lying in the merchant anchorage. It was near to the Batten reef where the Commerzieweathin Haupt dropped anchor only for it to begin dragging immediately. The vessel went astern until it sruck the Batten reef shortly after Five a.m (1). Distress rockets were sent up from the Mount Batten coastguard station and the life boat The Prince Consort was launched. During this time the steam tug Napoleon had managed to saved five of the crew by making two attempts in a small boat to approach the stricken vessel. The tug then towed the lifeboat to the leeward side of the wreck and were successful in collection the six remaining crew. The rescued crew were then taken to the Royal William yard in lifeboat, under tow from the steamer, and from there to the Sailors' home (2).

(1) "Multiple News Items." The Royal Cornwall Gazette, Falmouth Packet, and General Advertiser,Tuesday, November 30, 1865, pg. 7,Issue 3256, Sourced from the British Library
(2) "Multiple News Items." The Standard,Tuesday, November 28, 1865,Issue 12888, Sourced from the British LIbrary
(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Concord (1782)

1782

Concordia (1824)

Location Description Dead Man's Bay, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060209
Craft Type Ketch
Date of loss November 1824
Manner of loss Stranded
Nationality Sweden
Departure Port Finland
Destination Port Marseill
Master Matson

`Plymouth, 23d Nov. Last night a most tremendous hurricane was experienced here, exceeding in violence anything ever remembered, the wind blowing at times from WSW and SE and the damage done among the shipping and on shore has been immense, the extent of it within the limits of this port, cannot as yet be ascertained. In Deadman's Bay...CONCORDIA, Matson, Finland, for Marseilles, full of water.'(1)

(1) Lloyd's, 1969: Lloyd's list, 26-NOV-1824, No 5963

Conqueror (1760) ...

Constance (1862)

Location Description Drake's Island, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060351
Craft Type Sailing Vessel
Date of loss September 1862
Manner of loss Foundered
Nationality United Kingdom

Foundered/Total Loss (A)

Constance (1888) ...

Constantine (1866)

Location Description Drake's Island, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060409
Craft Type Sloop
Date of loss 1866
Manner of loss Stranded
Nationality United Kingdom
Cargo Pigs
Crew 2
Master Nicholas Neal

`Vessel was loaded with pigs, shipped by Soc. Graster of Treginier. On Thursday 15.03, the weather thick and a strong SSE wind blowing, when 5 miles SSW of the Eddystone saw a smack 1 mile distant which bore down on them. The master of the CONSTANTINE waved his hand for the smack to pass astern of them, but her master took no notice, came on and carried away her bowsprit, main boom, sails and gaff. Only then was her name, SPRING of Faversham, obvious. The crippled sloop hoisted distress signals and made for Plymouth, just reaching Drakes Island at 1.15pm, when she filled and sank.' (A)

HMS Coquille (1798) ...

Cornelius (1700)

1700

Coromandel (1808)

Location Description Breakwater, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060210
Craft Type Ketch
Date of loss 22nd November 1824
Manner of Loss Wrecked
Departure Port Faro
Destination Port London
Cargo Cork

The Coromandel, 110 tons, had been making her way to London from Faro when disaster struck. At four o clock the Master and two crew were below decks, the mate and one another crew member were on watch, with the hatches closed. About 10 minutes later a sea struck the vessel apparently doing no damage. However a second struck five minutes later and took the ship under near the bilge. Such was the force that the watch was washed from the deck. Beneath the crew and one passenger were thrown about and became trapped under the cabin furniture. They recovered to find that the cabin deck was flooded to about six inches, which steadily rose to four feet. The captain moved to the scuttle hatch and attempted to call for the others before they moved into the coal hole. After an hour the water began to come into the hole and for a further six hours they remained in darkness not knowing what was happening to the ship, the water slowly rising to their chins. When it looked hopeless they felt the ship strike and within a minute the water began to recede, garnering hope for the crew. A second strike shortly after and the crew could see daylight from under the ship. By chance the ship had driven onto the western end of the breakwater with the hatches being knocked off by the impact. The crew emerged onto the breakwater and managing to find a one of their own flags and raised it in distress. The flag was noticed by a local pilot who came to their assistance. Nothing but the bottom of the vessel remained with the cargo completely gone. (1)

(1) "SHIP NEWS." Morning Post,30 Nov 1824,19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Coronation (1691) ...

Coronel (1888)

Location Description Plymouth Sound
Reference NMR 1066774
Craft Type Sailing Vessel
Date of loss 26th November 1888
Manner of Loss Foundered
Departure Port Plymouth
Cargo Fish
Crew 2
Owner J Toms
Master S Chowen

Vessel capsized and lost in squally conditions in Plymouth Sound. (A)

Cosmopolite (1803)

Location Description Plymouth
Reference NMR 877190
Craft Type Sailing Vessel
Date of loss December 1803
Manner of Loss Wrecked

`Plymouth 25...several vessels are drove on shore here in a violent gale, among the number is the COSMOPOLITE
privateer.'
(1)

Larn states that the vessel was a French Privateer taken as a prize (A).

(1) Lloyd's, 1969: Lloyd's list, 27 DEC 1803, No 4414
(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

HMS Crane (1808) ...

Cretabode (1955) ...

Crystal Palace (1862)

Location Description Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060347
Craft Type Sailing Vessel
Date of loss December 1803
Date Built 1850
Manner of Loss Foundered
Nationality United Kingdom
Cargo Mackerel
Crew 8
Master George Page

The fishing smack Crystal Palace, from Hastings foundered while coming into harbour during a heavy SW gale. She was running for the sound around 11 O Clock on Sunday afternoon when the vessel was struck by heavy sea near Knap buoy causing her to capsize. The accident was seen by ships near by. The steamer Isabella Croll sent boats to the spot of the accident, the harbour-master despatching a boat also. The crew, however, were all lost. During the course of the afternoon the stern of the wreck was picked up. The wreck which had drifted towards Redding Point was taken back in under tow. It appeared that the bottom of the smack had been knocked out (1).

(1) "THE STORM OF SUNDAY.—THE LOSS OF EIGHT LIVES OFF PLYMOUTH." Daily News,11 Mar. 1862, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced by the British Library

Cygnet (1891)

Location Description Plymouth Hoe
Reference NMR 1067186
Craft Type Sailing Vessel
Date of loss 16th October 1891
Manner of Loss Stranded
Nationality United Kingdom
Master J F Hill

Vessel broke from her moorings and stranded in wind conditions SW force 9 (A).

Czarowitz (1877)

Location Description Bear's Head, Cattewater
Reference NMR 1065448
Craft Type Brig
Date Built 1866
Date of loss 15th October 1877
Manner of Loss Wrecked
Built Brixham
Nationality United Kingdom
Cargo Minerals
Master Bartlett (1) R Morman

"The Brig Czarowitz, 190 tons, Captain Bartlett, belonging to Mr W.H. Smith, of Plymouth, arrived on Sunday from Huelva to discharge a cargo of mineral in Catwater; she dragged her anchors, and also drove ashore, sustaining considerable damage" (1). The vessel was towed off the rocks at high water and moved to a place of safety.

(1) "The Weather." Times , 17 Oct. 1877, pg 6. The Times Digital Archive

Dab/Dabb (1871)

Location Description Great Mewstone
Reference NMR 1139639
Craft Type Dandy
Date of loss 15th October 1877
Manner of Loss Wrecked
Built Plymouth
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port Brixham
Destination Port Plymouth
Crew 3
Master Francis Morley

On her way from Torbay to Plymouth, in order to fit out the vessel for the upcoming Herring fishing season, the Dabb struck the wreck of the Ajax just of the the great Mewstone. It was found impaled on the iron of framing of the Ajax's engines; the paddle-steamer had sunk 16 years previous. No sign of the crew were seen and had most likely drowned. They included Francis Morley, Master; Lapidge (Gulley) a plymouth Fisherman and John stokes a boy of sixteen.

(1) "DISTRICT NEWS." Trewman's Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser, 22 Nov. 1871, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Dahlia (1900)

Location Description Renny Rocks, Mewstone
Reference NMR 1067732
Craft Type Ketch
Date Built 1878
Date of loss 15th October 1877
Manner of Loss Wrecked
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port Brixham
Crew 4
Master C J Mumford

The trawler Dahlia went ashore just off the Mewstone while fishing out of Brixham. Although the weather was fine there was a heavy sea running. The crew made attempts to free the vessel, however they took to ther boat and made for Plymouth. (1)

(1) "THE UNITED KINGDOM." Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, 25 Nov 1900,19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Daisy (1903) ...

Dart (1833)

Location Description Bear's Head, Cattewater
Reference NMR 1060230
Craft Type Brig
Date of loss 20th February 1833
Manner of loss Standed, Bilged
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port Plymouth
Cargo Ballast
Owner Ridley
Master Drew

The brig Dart was was driven onshore near the Bear's Head due to gales that struck Plymouth between the 19th and 20th of February 1833. The ship was bilged and a total loss, though most of her materials were saved. (1)

(1) "SHIP NEWS." Morning Post, 23 Feb. 1833, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Dawn (1890)

Location Description Plymouth Hoe, Near
Reference NMR 1067023
Craft Type Yacht
Propulsion Steam
Date of loss 20th September 1890
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port Plymouth
Owner JC Barnis (A) Barber (1)

The steam yacht Dawn, owned by Mr T.C. Barber of the Royal Corinthian Yacht Club was washed ashore during gales that struck Plymouth on Saturday the 20th September 1890. The vessel was smashed to pieces. (1)

(1) "Wreck of a Yacht" Daily News, 22 Sept. 1890, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Dazzler (1886)

Location Description Plymouth Sound
Reference NMR 1066606
Craft Type Fishing Vessel
Date of loss 10th November 1886
Manner of loss Collision
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port Brixham

Vessel sank following collision with the trawler Why Not (A)

Denbigh (1780)

1780

Dispatch (1756)

1756

Dover Prize (1689) ...

Drakes Island Barge...

Drie Gebroeders (1800)

Location Description Queen's Battery, Cattewater
Reference NMR 1062450
Craft Type Sailing Vessel
Date of loss 22nd April 1800
Manner of Loss Wrecked
Nationality Netherlands
Departure Port Charleston
Destination Port Altona
Cargo Tobacco, Coffee
Master Schew (A) Schow (1)

"The Twee Gebroeders, Schow, master, which has been several months under repair at this port, with a valuable cargo of tobacco, coffee, &c. in turning out of the Catwater this afternoon, missed stays, and struck on the reef of rocks near the Queen's Battery, soon bilged, head under water." (1)

(1) "PLYMOUTH." Trewman's Exeter Flying Post, 24 Apr 1800, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Dunwich (1714) ...

Dutton (1796) ...

(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

HMS Echo (1781) ...

Eclipse (1812)

Location Description Plymouth
Reference NMR 877264
Craft Type Sailing Vessel
Date of loss 19th October 1812
Manner of loss Driven on shore
Nationality United Kingdom

`Damage at Plymouth during a violent gale at SW on Sunday night and Monday morning...the ECLIPSE, and the
GASCOYNE, were driven on shore.'
(1)

(1) Lloyd's 1969, Lloyd's list, 23-OCT-1812, No 4713

Edwin and Ann (1827)

Location Description Plymouth Harbour
Reference NMR 1060216
Craft Type Sailing Vessel
Date Built 1818
Date of loss 1827
Manner of loss Stranded
Nationality United Kingdom

Stranded/ Total Loss (A)

Elise (1883)

Location Description Plymouth Hoe, Needles Reef
Reference NMR 1066046
Craft Type Barque
Date of loss 2nd September 1883
Manner of Loss Wrecked
Nationality Norway
Built Netherlands
Destination Port London
Cargo Deals
Crew 9
Master Wright Wilhelm

"At Plymouth the raged with great fury, and early this morning the Norwegian Barque Elise, from Pablio, dashed ashore. She had been driven to Plymouth, and there parted one anchor after another. She struck on the rocks stern first, and then swing round and broke her back on the ladies' bathing place. She parted in two near the bows. Here the crew of nine had gathered, and the Plymouth life boat, responding to signals burnt, agllantly succeeded in taking them off in a short time. The ship split to pieces, and great baulks were cast by mountainous waves on the high cliffs; and the coast was strewn by wreckage.." (1).

The crew were landed at the Barbican and then sent on to the Sailor's home (A).

(1) "HEAVY GALE AND WRECKS." Standard, 3 Sept. 1883, pg3, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Eliza (1852)

Location Description Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060300
Craft Type Sloop
Date of loss 13th November 1852
Manner of Loss Collision
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port St Valery
Destination Port London
Cargo Vegetables, Potatoes
Crew 2

Sank following collision at 8am, with the wooden brig George Robinson, causing the loss of one man and a boy. (A)

(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Eliza and Ann (1860)

Location Description Batten Reef, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060339
Craft Type Schooner
Built 1839
Date of loss 14th November 1860
Manner of Loss Driven Ashore
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port Cardiff
Destination Port Caen
Hull Displacement 51 tonnes
Cargo Coal
Master Evan Lewis

Forced into Plymouth Sound by bad weather, the Eliza and Ann anchored one mile offshore at 5pm. The wind increased to a WSW gale, and despite 40 fathoms of anchor chain being let out, it parted and she was driven ashore on the rock. Her hull was pierced in several places, causing her to become a total loss. (A)

Elizabeth (1) (1852)

 

Elizabeth (2) (1859)

Location Description Mount Batten. Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060334
Craft Type Schooner
Date Built 1820
Date of loss 1st November 1859
Manner of Loss Driven Ashore, Bilged
Nationality United Kingdom
Hull Displacement 85 tonnes
Built Newport
Departure Port Cork
Destination Port Plymouth
Cargo Oats
Master Evan Lewis

The Elizabeth left Ballinacurra at 3pm on 26th of October 1859. After arriving at Plymouth on Tuesday 1st of November she anchored at 6am in the Sound, but in the strong gale, parted both anchor chains and drove ashore under Mount Batten. The vessel was cleared of all her stores, fittings and cargo, since she was obviously going to become a total wreck, her sternpost having already pulled out and the vessel bilged. (A)

HMT Elk (1940) ...

Ellen Rickmers (1882)

Location Description Penlee Point
Craft type Barque
Date of loss 29th November 1882
Manner of loss Collision
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom(a), Germany(1,2)
Hull Displacement 307 tons
Cargo Coco, Nuts and Ivory
Departure port Guayaquil
Destination port Plymouth
Crew 11 tonnes
Master Seqhorn L.A.

The Ellen Rickmers, a German barque having made a collision with the Guide Captained by Mr. Nurse, the Guide taking great lengths to keep off her as much as possible, the Guide however lost her jib boom, headgear and retained damage to her cutwater. The Ellen Rickmers fate was destined one mile from the breakwater, her pilot and three crew members boarded the Guide but soon left on a fishing boat, landing in Plymouth later that night. Her Captain Mr. Legorn and the remainder of her crew landed the next day at 10:30pm again in Plymouth by a fishing boat. The complete loss of the Ellen Rickmers was the resulting outcome from the collision. (1)

(1)"SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE." Morning Post, London, England, 1 Dec. 1882, pg 8, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(2)"REPORTED FOUNDERING OF A BARQUE." Sheffield & Rotherham Independent, Sheffield, England, 1 Dec. 1882, pg 2, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Emma (1889)

Location Description Plymouth Sound
Reference NMR 1066992
Craft type Sailing Vessel
Date of loss 22nd November 1889
Manner of loss Collision
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Hull Displacement 1 ton
Departure port Plymouth
Crew 2

A spritsail rigged vessel, which sank following collision with a steam launch belonging to a Russian man o'war, in wind conditions SW force 3.(A)

Emmanuel (1863)

Location Description Mount Batten Reef
Reference NMR 1060353
Craft type Brig
Date of loss 7th January 1863
Manner of loss Stranded
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom

Stranded/Total Loss. (A)

Encourage (1940) ...

Endeavour (1798)

Location Description Plymouth
Reference NMR 877155
Craft type Cargo Vessel
Date of loss 14th December 1798
Manner of loss Fire
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Cargo Coal
Destination port Guernsey

The Endeavour was a cargo ship bound for Guernsey with coal when she caught fire. She had been close to the Frigate Coquille, and caught ablaze after the ship exploded. The ship and her cargo were completely destroyed, however all her crew were saved.

(1) Grocott T., 1997, Shipwrecks of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Eras, Chatham Publishing, ISBN 1 86176 030 2, p65

Enid (1891)

Location Description Devil's Point, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1067196
Craft type Cutter
Date Built 1890
Date of loss 11th November 1891
Manner of loss Stranded
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Hull Displacement 6 tonnes
Owner Naval Ordnance Dept, Plymouth

Vessel broke from her moorings and stranded in wind conditions SSE force 9. (A)

Enterprise (1898)

Location Description Near Drake's Island, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1067594
Craft type Hopper Barge
Date of loss 24th June 1898
Manner of loss Foundered
Nationality United Kingdom
Hull Displacement 100 tonnes
Departure Port Plymouth (& Return)
Cargo Silt
Crew 3
Owner Relf
Master T R H Corry

The hopper barge Enterprise foundered whilst under tow leaving Plymouth Sound in wind conditions SW force 5. (A)

Enterprize (1812)

Location Description Plymouth Sound
Reference NMR 877258
Craft type Sloop
Date of loss 7th October 1812
Manner of loss Stranded
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom

`The sloop Enterprize, of Plymouth, was on shore at that port on Wednesday, and it was feared would be lost.' (1)

(1) Lloyd's, 1969: Lloyd's list,09-OCT-1812, No.4709

Erin (1) (1818)

Location Description Plymouth Sound
Reference NMR 877301
Craft type Sailing Vessel
Date of loss 20th February 1818
Manner of loss Stranded
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port Liverpool
Destination Port Savannah

Stranded/Total Loss. (A)

Erin (2) (1833)

Location Description Plymouth Sound
Reference NMR 1060232
Craft type Brig (A)
Date Built 1829
Date of loss 20th February 1833
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail (A)
Nationality United Kingdom
Hull Displacement 331 Tonnes
Departure Port Liverpool
Destination Port Savannah
Crew 10
Master George Gale

The Erin, of Liverpool, was attempting to enter Plymouth Sound during gales when she struck the breakwater, the vessel soon becoming a wreck (1). Assistance was rendered by HMS Spartiate, however not by the 1st Lieutenant who asked for a volunteer from his officers due to the danger. The 2nd Master Francis Strong stepped foward. It was Strong's boat that was first to reach the Breakwater and succeeding in rescuing five people. After this feat Strong leapt into the water followed by two of his crew who succeeding in rescuing the 2nd mate of the Erin. It was noted that this was not the first time that Mr. Strong had been instrumental in saving lives in danger of being drowned (2).

At almost the same time the Erin, steamer bound for Ireland, which left Plymouth around the same time suffered a similar fate, though with the loss of fifty lives.

(1) "THE LATE STORM." Morning Post, 27 Feb. 1833, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(2) "The Erin, of Liverpool -" Times [London, England] 18 Mar. 1833: 2. The Times Digital Archive
(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Erna (1914)

Location Description Drake's Island
Reference NMR 1070203
Craft type Schooner
Date Built 1909
Date of loss 21st February 1914
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality Germany
Hull Displacement 91 Tonnes
Built Bremen
Departure Port St. Malo
Destination Port Charlestown
Crew 4
Master Peter Kuhlke

"While the gale was at its height at Plymouth on Saturday night the German schooner Erna, of Bremen, dragged her anchors and went ashore on Drake's Island. The Erna, a small iron-built vessel of 215 tons, owned and commanded by Captain Kuhlki, had a crew of five all told. She was bound from St. Malo to Charlestown, Cornwall, in ballast, and took shelter in Plymouth Sound on Saturday afternoon. Her anchors failed to hold her, and about an hour before midnight she drifted on to the island. Flares were burnt by the crew, and the lifeboat was promptly launched, while the Government tug Rover and another tug also made for the spot. The whole of the men were taken off and conveyed to the Sailors' Home. Last night the Erna was reported to be breaking up." (1)

(1) "A Stormy Week-End." Times, 23 Feb 1914, pg 5,. The Times Digital Archive.
(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Espoir (1865)

Location Description Mount Batten Reef
Reference NMR 1060365
Craft type Brig
Date of loss 22nd November 1865
Manner of loss Collision
Propulsion Sail
Nationality Belgium
Departure Port Rio Grande (1)
Destination Port Birkenhead (1)
Cargo Bone Ash (1)
Crew 11
Master Durand (2)

The Espoir, Belgian Brig under Captain Durand, bound for Birkenhead with a cargo of Bone Ash drifted stern on to the rocks in Batten Bay; after she had collided with another ship and her bowsprit and topsail had been carried away. As high tide came she began to be floated but the wind kept her on the rocks. She was towed off by a steamer and berthed in Sutton Pool (2). Her crew of eleven, were saved by the Plymouth lifeboat Prince Consort.(A)

(1) "TERRIFIC GALE." Morning Post,  23 Nov 1865, pg6, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(2) "THE RECENT GALE." Morning Post, 24 Nov. 1865, pg6, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Eugenie (1893)

Location Description Great Western Dock, Plymouth
Reference Larn
Craft type Schooner
Date Built 1856
Date of loss 4th February 1893
Manner of loss Stranded
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Hull Displacement 71 t
Departure Port Plymouth
Destination Port Hale
Crew 4
Master Guy

Vessel stranded and lost in wind condition S force 4 (A).

Eureka (1895)

Location Description Sutton Harbour, Plymouth
Reference Larn
Craft type Cutter
Date Built 1867
Date of loss 25th February 1895
Manner of loss Stranded
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Hull Displacement 37t
Departure Port Plymouth (Fishing & Return)
Crew 4
Master J P Hosking

Stranded/Total Loss (A).

Excelsior (1902)

Location Description Shagstone Nr, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1067861
Craft type Ketch
Date Built 1878
Date of loss 29th March 1902
Manner of loss Stranded
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Hull Displacement 43t
Departure Port Plymouth (Fishing & Return)
Crew 3
Master J Hill

Vessel stranded and lost in fog and wind conditions SW force 1 (A).

Exeter and Portsmouth (1756)

Location Description Plymouth
Reference NMR 876488
Date of loss November 1756
Manner of loss Stranded
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Master John Ford

Stranded/Total Loss (A).

Fair City (1919)

Location Description 100 yds east of Breakwater Fort, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1071475
Craft type Schooner
Date Built 1877
Date of loss 8th January 1919
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Hull Displacement 72t
Built Milford
Departure Port Fowey
Destination Port Grimbsy
Crew 5
Master Frederick Allison

Vessel was carrying ballast in the form of stone and clay, and had two naval gunners on board. Having left Fowey the wind increased and, by the time she was seven miles west of the Eddystone, conditions were quite dreadful. Her master made for Plymouth, where he arrived at 7.35pm in a full SSE gale. Whilst trying to enter the east entrance, she drifted at great speed broadside onto the breakwater, going ashore at a point 100 yards east of the breakwater fort at 7.45pm. Her mainmast fell overboard and the noise caused the troops from the fort to turn on their searchlight, illuminating the wreck. Ropes were thrown from the breakwater and the crew scrambled ashore, losing all their effects, the vessel going to pieces along with all her gear and stores. The loss of the vessel was attributed to her having gybed at a critical moment (A).

Falcon (1971)

Location Description Cawsand Bay, Plymouth Sound
Reference NMR 1520856
Craft type Ketch
Date Built 1971
Date of loss 1st February 1971
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail (auxiliary engine)
Nationality United Kingdom

Blown ashore in Force 10 wind conditions and wrecked, two young children on board drowned (A).

Fame (1782)

Location Description Devil's Point, Plymouth
Reference NMR 876598
Craft type Unspecified
Date of loss 28th November 1782
Manner of loss Stranded
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port Newfoundland
Destination Port Poole

`The Fame of Poole, one of the Newfoundland ships, in going up Hamoaze, was driven on shore near the Devil's Point through the violence of the wind and bilged, and it is feared will be lost. Part of her cargo is saved.'(1)

(1) Sherborne Mercury, 2nd December 1782, pg3

Farmers Delight (1817)

Location Description Mount Batten, Plymouth
Reference NMR 877291
Craft type Sloop
Date of loss 18th January 1817
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom

`A violent gale of wind at about SSW attended with a very high tide, was experienced at Plymouth...on Saturday night and Sunday morning... the sloop Farmer's Delight was lost on Mount Batten. Crew saved.' (1)

(1) Lloyd's, 1969 Lloyd's list, 24 Jan 1817, No.5146

Favourite (1824)

1824

Fearful (1872)

Location Description Cobbler Channel, Plymouth Sound
Reference NMR 1064803
Craft type Brig
Date of loss 8th December 1872
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Built Milford
Cargo Coal
Departure Port Sunderland (1)
Destination Port Devonport (1)
Crew 9 (2)
Master Williamson (1)

The brig Fearful anchored in the Sound to the W of Cobbler's Buoy. In bad weather, the harbour master asked her captain to move from this dangerous position, but, in moving, they had to pay out all their cable to avoid a schooner. A tremendous gust of wind then started her anchors dragging, but by the time the steam tug Trusty and the lifeboat arrived on the scene, the brig was already bumping on the rocks. Captain Williamson the master of the Fearful at first refused to leave, but with holes in her bottom and filling rapidly, her crew were eventually taken off and landed at the Barbican. The lifeboat in fact suffered major damage in this, her first rescue, as she was thrown against the rocks, and it says much for the spirit of the crew, that they were prepared to go out for a second time, knowing that much of their vital bouyancy had been lost (A).

(1) "VIOLENT GALES." Daily News, 9 Dec 1872, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(2) "THE HURRICANE." Trewman's Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser, 11 Dec. 1872, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Fearless (1804) ...

Fidelity (1834)

Location Description Mewstone, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1133199
Craft type Unspecified
Date of loss 28th November 1834
Manner of loss Stranded
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port Teignmouth
Destination Port Dartmouth

Stranded/ Total Loss (A).

Firewater

Flirt (1891)

Location Description Plymouth Sound
Reference NMR 1067152
Craft type Unspecified
Date of loss 3rd July 1891
Manner of loss Foundered
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Hull Displacement 2t
Departure Port Devonport
Crew 2

Vessel foundered and lost in wind conditions W x S force 5 (A).

Flora (1800)

Location Description Plymouth Sound
Reference Larn
Craft type Brig
Date of loss 22nd November 1800
Manner of loss Foundered
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Destination Port Gibraltar
Armament 14 Guns
Master Lt Carpenter

The armed Brig Flora, 14 guns, under Lt. Carpenter was lost in mysterious circumstances while at anchor in Hamoaze. The ship had been victualled for a voyage to Gibraltar with Government dispatches. It was reported that there was very little wind the night of her loss, yet she drifted onto the rocks under Mount Wise. The crew cut away her masts but she heeled over and she sunk in deep water (1).
At low tide the vessel was seen on the rocks off Mount Wise and hopes were entertained that her stores and guns may be removed. However as she was fully laden at the time of her sinking the damage was extensive and any repairs may prove of great expense (2).

(1) "PLYMOUTH." Trewman's Exeter Flying Post,  27 Nov 1800, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library
(2) "Plymouth Nov 22" Caledonian Mercury, 27 Nov. 1800, 19th Century British Newspapers, Sourced from the British Library

Florence May (1886)

1886

Florinda (1896)

1896

Fly (1) (1758)

1758

Fly (2) (1792)

1792

Flyvende Ulv (1691)...

 

Fortitude (1791)

1791

Fortuna (1880)

1880

(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

HMS Foyle (1915) ...

Francis (1884)

1884

Francis Patrick (1968) ...

French Frigate (1801)

1801

Friends (1852)

1852

Friendship (1) (1812)

1812

Friendship (2) (1862)

1862

Frolic (1860)

1860

Fylrix (1984) ...

Gascoyne (1812)

1812

General Brock (1843)

1843

General Burton (1765)

1765

General Gates (1800)

1800

Glen Strathallan (1970) ...

Glenrose (1921)

1921

Glory (1785)

1785

Good Intent (1) (1762)

1762

Good Intent (2) (1825)

1825

Granville (1762)

Location Description Cattewater
Reference NMR 1062434
Craft type Sailing Vessel
Date of loss 15th January 1762
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port London
Destination port Dublin
Master Jones

"... with the wind at S.W. an last night, or early this morning, the following vessels were driven on there in Catwater, viz, the Granville, Jones, of and from London for Dublin; and the John and Sukey, McAdam, from London for Cork and the West Indies, both which ships are lost and very little of the cargoes will be saved."(1)

(1) "News" General Evening Post , January 14 - January 16 1762, Issue 4409, Sourced from the British Library

Graziona Annetta (1798)

1798

Greyhound (1867)

1867

Hariel Haar (1794)

1794

Harmony (1822)

1822

Harriet Thompson (1915)

1915

Harwich (1691) ...

Havering (1860)

1860

Haydon (1828)

1828

Henrietta (1689) ...

Henry (1810)

1810

Hiawatha (1861)

1861

Hibernia (1824)

1824

(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Hope (1670)

1670

Hopper Barge No. 42 (1913) ...

Horace (1812)

1812

Ida (1889)

1889

HMS Imogene (1840) ...

Indian Trader (1828)

1828

Industry (1757)

1757

Industry (1773)

1773

Industry (1851)

1851

Irex (1899)

1899

James (1833)

1833

James and Elizabeth (1811)

1811

SS James Eagan Layne (1945) ...

James Hattie (1866)

1866

Jane (1804)

1804

(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Jane Matilda (1866)

1866

HMS Jasper (1817) ...

Jeane Adelle (1814)

1814

Jeffrouw Ida Maria (1753)

1753

SS Jellicoe Rose (1938)

1938

Jersey (1764)

1764

Jessie Lawson (1828)

1828

Jeune Albert (1894)

1894

Johann II (1865)

1865

John (1824)

1824

John and Hannah (1752)

1752

John and Martha (1798)

1798

John and Robert (1828)

1828

John and Sukey (1762)

Location Description Cattewater
Reference NMR 1062435
Craft type Sailing Vessel
Date of loss 15th January 1762
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port London
Destination port Cork & West Indies
Master McAdam

Driven ashore in the Cattewater. See also Granville

John Cutter (1800)

1800

John May (1880)

1880

John Munro (1866)

1866

John Pardew (1850)

1850

Jong Pieter (1813)

1813

Jonge Jan Swaarts (1803)

1803

JST (1883)

1883

Juffrow Edia Maria (1774)

1774

Julia (1891) ...

K32 (1795)

1795

Kate (1887)

1887

HMT Kingston Alalite (1940) ...

Kite (1901)

1901

Kitty (1796)

1796

L’Amiable Maria (1786)

1786

L’Effronteur (1804)

1804

Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

La Louisa (1763)

1763

La Vutoire (1799)

1799

Lady Edgcumbe (1790)

1790

Lady of Avenel (1877)

Location Description Plymouth, Deadman's Bay
Reference NMR 1065452
Craft type Schooner
Date built 1874
Date of loss 15th October 1877
Manner of loss Driven ashore,wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Hull length 30.24
Hull beam 7.01
Hull draft 3.72
Built Trethown
Master W. Jordon

 

In a severe gale in October of 1887 Plymouth was first struck by a southbound gale and then a north westerly, great damage was done to coast and vessel though-out the sound. Included in the loss was that of the schooner The Lady of Avenel, reported in local news on the 16th of October 1877 having been driven ashore from the gale it is assumed she also wrecked due to heavy damage that was reported. (1,2)

(1) The Daily News London, England Tuesday, October 16, 1877 Issue 9824
(2)  The Sheffield & Rotherham Independent Sheffield, England Tuesday, October 16, 1877 pg 3 Issue 5863

(A)

 

Lancaster ED450G (1943) ...

Lapwing (1817)

Location Description Millbay
Reference NMR 877292
Craft type Cutter
Date of loss 19th January 1817
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom

"The Lapwing Revenue cutter is on shore and bilged in Mill-Bay; crew saved"(1)

(1) "Saturday's Post." The Bury and Norwich Post: Or, Suffolk, Norfolk, Essex, Cambridge, and Ely Advertiser,Wednesday, January 29, 1817; pg1; Issue 1805,19th Century British Library Newspapers

Laurel (1872)

1872

Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

HMS Lavinia (1868) ...

Les Amis (1803)

1803

Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Les Deux Amis (1803)

1803

Les Trois Anges (1872)

1872

Liberty (1838)

1838

Lily of Devon (1911)

1911

Louisa (1809)

1809

Lovely (1757)

1757

Loyal Comfort (1749)

1749

Loyalty (1783)

1783

Lucy (1890) ...

Lucy Maud (1908)

1908

Maejub (1970)

1970

Magdalen (1813)

1813

Main (1892)

1892

Maria (1760)

1760

Maria (1774) ...

Marie Adele (1872)

1872

Marie Banche (1886)

1886

Mars (1809)

1809

Mars (1813)

1813

Martha (1779)

1779

Martha (1834)

1834

Mary (1759)

1759

Mary (1800)

1800

Mary (1795)

1795

Mary Ann (1828)

1828

Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Mary Ann (1854)

1854

Mayflower (1843)

1843

Medoc (1940) ...

Memory (1877)

1877

Mentor (1834)

1834

Fireship Mermaid (1693) ...

Messerschmitt BF109 (13014) (1942) ...

Mewstone Ledge Site (17th C.) ...

Mewstone Submarine ...

Minerva (1763)

1763

Miranda (1902)

1902

Mischief (1865)

1865

Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Miura (1867)

1867

Mizpah (1899)

1899

Moor (1716) ...

Myra (1886)

1886

Mystery (1891)

1891

N.S. de Padron de Serra (1762)

1762

Nancy (1813)

1813

Nepaul (1890)

Neptune (1761)

1761

Newfoundland Convoy (1801)

No name (1813)

1813

No name (1804)

1804

No. 9 (1894)

1894

Nora (1895)

1895

Norman (1843)

1843

Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Nova Rosa (1883)

1883

Nuestra Senora de Almas (1763)

1763

Nuova Virginia (1885)

1885

Ocean (1853)

1853

Ocean Queen (1852)

The 206 ton brig Ocean Queen was built in Wells-next-the-Sea in 1851 and was owned by James Shepherd of Lime Street Square and her master was Joseph William Hore. The Ocean Queen was wrecked on the Little Mewstone on 26th December 1852 in a force 11 south-westerly gale, she was on a voyage from London to Jamaica carrying a mixed cargo. The wreck quickly broke up, drowning the 14 crew and two passengers on board whose bodies washed up on shore over the following days.

'The unfortunate ship totally lost to the eastward of Plymouth on Monday morning during the terrific storm which prevailed from the southward is estimated to burden about 400 tons. It is supposed that the master was endeavouring to make the port of Plymouth from the eastward, and, having caught sight of the breakwater light inside the range of the Great Mewstone, he erroneously considered himself in the fair way for the harbour, and did not discover his error until the ship became entangled on the dangerous reefs connected with the Great and Little Mewstones, or the Slimer's Rocks, inside. In either case she would be immediately dashed to pieces and all her ill-fated crew would perish. A portion of her wreck was washed ashore in Oker Bay on Wembury Church beach, which is west of the river Yealm. It consists of the stern frame, with a part of the tuck. The frame is painted black, and has on it, in large white letters, "OCEAN QUEEN, of London". From the description of those parts of the cargo washed ashore, it is conjectured that she was bound for the West Indies. They comprise quantities of unbleached calico in pieces 40 or more yards long, ladies' dresses, women's straw bonnets and turnovers, thousands of reels of fine cotton thread, warppers, men's shirts and woollen Scotch caps, sperm candles, new wooden hoops, empty casks, marked "Bass's ale", and numbers of hampers, one having attached to it a label, with the rods, "From F. Walton, iron chandler and oil merchant, 283, Wapping, London"; several pieces of deal board, being part headings of casks, marked "A.L." in a diamond, followed by "C"; also candle boxes, marked "M. F. x P." over "B. B. C.", and one of them, "1064". Mr Barnes, RN, chief officer of Coast Guard in Wembury, and Captain Thompson, Queen's harbour-master at Bovisand, are adopting measures for securing anything of value which may be drifted ashore. Lloyd's List of the 4th inst., states that the OCEAN QUEEN, 209 tons register, Captain Horn, belonging to Mr James Shepherd, of 1, Lime-street-square, cleared for Jamaica.' (4)

'Commander Kennedy, chief of Coast Guard in this district ... has been exerting himself in relation to the wreck of the OCEAN QUEEN. This officer made three unsuccessful attempts to-day to reach the great Mewstone, on the western side of which the two masts and part of the deck are visible. These attempts failed in consequence of the heavy swell. Captain Kennedy has secured the register, which states that the brig was built at Wells, Norfolk, in May, 1851, 206 tons register, and that Joseph William Hore became master May 10, 1852. Fourteen bodies were washed ashore - two, it is supposed, were passengers, and nine look like seamen; two are Mulattoes and one is a negro.' (4)

OCEAN QUEEN, brig, 206 register tonnage under the old Act, 209 under the new, yellow metal sheathing 1851. Not overstamped or cancelled during the life of the Register, but does not appear in the following year's Register (1853). (5)

NMR 1547892

(1) ADM Wk Rtn 1852;
(2) BOT Wk Summary 1859 p22
(3) Illustrated London News 01 Jan 1853 No 601 P7,
(4) The Times 29 Dec 1852, P8,
(5) Lloyd's 1964 Lloyd's register of British and foreign shipping, 1852, No.43(O)

Orion (1807)

1807

Orion (1808)

1808

Orion (1887)

1887

Brigantine

Scottish vessel stranded and lost in squally weather on the breakwater.(1)

Built: 1856
Where Built: Nova Scotia
Master: J Templeton
Crew: 5
Owner: R S McMorland, Greenock

NMR 1066739

Ottowa (1912)

1912

Ours

HMS Pallas (1798) ...

Palmyra (1867)

1867

Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Pals (1933)

1933

Palsgrave (1637) ...

Patrick (1968) ...

Patriot (1895)

1895

SS Persier (1945) ...

Petrinick (1824)

1824

Phoenix (1811)

1811

Pinnace (1838)

1838

Pioneer (1897)

1897

Planet (1892)

1892

Plym (1967)

1967

Plympton (1828)

1828

Polly (1787)

1787

Polly (1890)

1890

Polly (1801)

6 November 1801

Sailing vessel from Bristol; 'the POLLY tender...is driven ashore at Plymouth, the crew saved'. (1)

LL No. 4, 201: 06.11.1801(Fri)(R)

FS Poulmic (1940) ...

Pride (1882)

1882

Princess Mary (1817)

1817

Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Prosperous (1774)

1774

Providence (1785)

Location Description Devil's Point
Reference NMR 876611
Craft type Cargo Vessel
Date of loss 4th January 1786
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port :Liverpool
Destination port Teignmouth
Master Manley

The cargo vessel Providence went ashore by Devil's Point while attempting to go up the Hamoaze in December 1785, her cargo was removed by lighters and at the time it was hoped that she could be saved; despite being very damaged (1). However it was not to be and she was reported in the following January to have gone to pieces in the last gale, in reference to the storm that raged on the 3rd and 4th of January (2).

(1) Whitehall Evening Post, London, England, 22 Dec 1785, Issue 6022

(2) Public Advertiser, London, England, 14 Jan 1786, Issue 16113

Providence (2) (1786)

1786

Providence (3) (1796)

1796

Providence (4) (1798)

1798

Providence (5) (1812)

1812

Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Providentia (1814)

1814

Prussian Hero (1762)

1762

R H Jones (1877)

Location Description Breakwater Plymouth
Reference NMR 1174731
Craft type Iron Barque
Built 1875 Pembroke Dock
Date of loss 14th October 1877
Manner of loss Foundered
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure Port Karrachee (Karachi)
Destination Port Newport
Master J Roberts
Owner William Jones

The R.H Jones was a 726 tonne iron Barque built at Pembroke dock in 1875. She had been returning from Karachi, via Bremen to unload, and was proceeding in ballast to Newport when she foundered near the Breakwater (3).
It had been announced some days before, in a telegraph from New York , that a cyclone was moving across the Atlantic towards the UK shores. Although it was a talking point for the shipping classes of Plymouth, it may not have reached the crew of the R.H Jones as they were returning from Pakistan, via Germany. The storm hit on Sunday the 14th of October 1877, the Western Independent described the scene from sunset


“The wind at that time was blowing freshly, and as the darkness came on its force gradually increased until about eleven o’clock from which time until four o’clock on Monday morning a perfect storm raged over the whole locality…” (2)


It is recorded that the storm reached force 11 (6), a violent gale not seen since the East Indiaman, Dutton had been wrecked under Plymouth Hoe (2). It would seem that devoid of cargo the R.H Jones was no match for the high waves lashing the English Channel and she was thrown completely over the Breakwater. The evidence of this was witnessed with her chains trailed across the breakwater, and her anchors attached to the outside (1). The storm would also claim the Albion and Rothesay

The first to realise the disaster was Mr Cooney R.N, chief of the Mount Batten station, who noticed  wreckage of a ship washed ashore in Jennycliff.  At around 8am on Monday he found the body of the ship’s master, Captain Roberts, washed ashore, who he identified from the letters ‘J.R’ in his stockings. It appeared from papers containing accounts of the Seaman’s wages, found near to Roberts that the ship had gone down with all hands, sadly also Robert’s wife and child.

Yet nearby the crew of screw corvette HMS Turquoise, had contacted the Russian consuls at Plymouth claiming that they had picked up a member of the Jones’ crew; a Russian Finn, clinging to a piece of wreckage (5). The man had been rescued after being spotted by crewman F.Barnes aboard the Turquoise, who dived into the dark waters to save the man. Barnes was awarded £10 for his bravery by his captain. However it would later turn out that the man was not a Russian, but rather a German exhausted from his ordeal (4).

(1)"THE STORM.—GREAT DESTRUCTION OF LIFE AND PROPERTY." Blackburn Standard: Darwen Observer, and North-East Lancashire Advertiser, 20 Oct. 1877 pg3,19th Century British Library Newspapers
(2)“The Gale” Western Independent,  17th  October 1877, pg3
(3)"VIOLENT GALE." Reynolds's Newspaper 21 Oct. 1877, 19th Century British Library Newspapers
(4)"TERRIFIC GALE." Newcastle Courant etc19 Oct. 1877, 19th Century British Library Newspapers
(5) "Multiple News Items." Standard, London, England, 17 Oct. 1877 pg6, 19th Century British Library Newspapers
(6) Parliamentary papers, Vol 64, Page(s) 8, 1878-9, Board of Trade Casualty Returns

Rame Barge ...

Randolph (1869)

1869

Ranger (1) (1760)

1760

Ranger (2) (1811)

1811

Redness (1812)

1812

Resolution (1793)

1793

Retrench (1824)

1824

Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Robert (1794)

1794

Roger (1933) ...

Rosamond (1786)

Location Description Sutton Pool
Craft type Cargo Vessel
Date of loss 4th January 1786
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Departure port :Newfoundland
Cargo Fish, oil

"The Rosamond, from Newfoundland, with fish and oil, sunk in the Pool and her stern stove in." (1)

(1) Public Advertiser, London, England, 11 Jan 1786, Issue 16110

SS Rosehill (1917) ...

Rothesay (1877) ...

Rover (1) (1804)

1804

Rover (2) (1816)

1816

Ruby (1905)

1905

Sally (1) (1785)

1785

San Nicolao (1780)

1780

Sarah (1) (1758)

1758

Sarah (1795)

Location Description Cattewater
Reference NMR 1336824
Craft type Transport
Date of loss 18th February 1795
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port Quiberon

The British Transport ship Sarah, was driven ashore during a storm and refloated the following day.

 

Sarah (3) (1834)

1834

Sarah Stibbs (1865)

1865

Saudadoes Prize (1712) ...

Scotia (1824)

1824

HMS Scylla (2004) ...

Sea Flower (1889)

1889

Seagull (1798)

1798

Seanymph (1762)

1762

Selina (1812)

1812

Shamrock (1) (1899)

1899

Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Shamrock (2) (1910)

1910

Silver Spray (1905)

1905

Sincerity (1797)

1797

Sophia (1858)

1858

Southampton (1) (1794)

1794

Southampton (1843)

Location Description Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060268
Craft type  
Date built  
Date of loss 13th January 1843
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Built  

Speculation (1809)

1809

Speculator (1828)

1828

Speedwell (1) (1786)

1786

Speedwell (2) (1860)

1860

Speedy (1864)

1864

Splendid (1892)

1892

St Anthony (1757)

1757

St Lucar (1757)

1757

St Pierre (1897)

1897

Stafford (1759)

1759

Star of the West (1867)

1867

Sultan (1816)

1816

Sunbeam (1891)

Location Description Penlee Point, 2 miles SSE
Craft type Hooker
Date of loss 30 October 1891
Manner of loss Target Practice
Construction wood
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Owner(s) John & Henry Harkcom

The Sunbeam was sunk in the same incident as the Alfonso.

Sunderland DD852 (1944) ...

Sunderland ML782 (1944) ...

Sunderland ML829 (1945) ...

Sunderland W6054 (1942) ...

Superior (1867)

1867

Sussex (1653) ...

Swallow (1777)

1777

Swanbon (1922)

1922

Swift (1892)

1892

Syd (1911)

1911

HMS Talavera (1840) ...

Tamar (1798)

1798

Tarrit (1362)

Location Description Plymouth Sound
Reference NMR 876197
Craft Type Sailing vessel
Date Built Unknown
Date of loss 1362
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality Unknown
Departure port Plymouth
Cargo Wool, cloth, tin
Crew Unknown

Wreck of cargo vessel, called a "tarrit", which stranded in Plymouth Sound, while outward-bound from Plymouth
with wool, cloth and tin; one of four vessels lost in this incident. Constructed of wood, she was a sailing vessel (2).

Tavy (1) (1902)

1902

Tavy (2) ...

Taxiarchos (1843) ...

Tayrles Bay (1771)

Teazer (1867)

1867

Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

HMS Telegraph (1817) ...

Temperance (1873)

1873

Thames (1781)

Location Description The Hoe
Reference NMR x
Craft Type Transport
Date Built Unknown
Date of loss 12 February 1781
Manner of loss Wrecked
Nationality United Kingdom
Departure port Plymouth
Destination port New York
Cargo Government stores
Crew Unknown

The 600 ton transport ship Thames was loaded with 450 tons of govenment stores destined for New York. At anchor between Drakes Island and the shore, she dragged her anchors in the same storm that sank HMS Echo and was dashed to pieces with only two men saved. Very little of her cargo was saved and another seven people lost their lives while attempting salvage when their boat overturned.

The Brothers (1854)

1854

Thetis (1838)

1838

Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

Thetis (1880)

1880

Thistle (1913)

1913

Thomas (1800)

1800

Thomas and Elizabeth (1757)

1757

Thought (1859)

1859

Three Brothers (1800)

1800

Three Sisters (1758)

1758

Totnes Castle (1967) ...

Traveller (1795)

1795

Traveller (1811)

1811

Trende Brodre (1811)

1811

Trojan (1811)

1811

Twee Gezustus (1786)

Location Description Sutton Pool
Craft type Cargo Vessel
Date of loss 4th January 1786
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Departure port :Bordeaux
Destination port Amsterdam
Cargo Wine, Prunes
Master Mitchel

During the night of the 3rd and morning of the 4th January 1786, Plymouth "had the severest gale of wind ever remembered by the oldest man living..." with a gale blowing SSE to S causing Sutton Pool to be "an entire scene of wreck". Amongst the wrecks was the Twe Gousters coming from Bordeaux with a cargo of wine and prunes bound for Amsterdam. She was reported to be sunk to her anchors in the pool and also had recieved considerable damage (1).

The gale also claimed the Rosamond and the Zeelust

(1) Public Advertiser, London, England, 11 Jan 1786, Issue 16110

Two Brothers (1757)

1757

Two Brothers (1834)

1834

Two Friends (1771)

1771

Two Sisters (1911)

1911

Tyger (1762)

1762

Britannia

Unanimity (1803)

1803

Uncle Jack (1868)

1868

Undine (1897)

1897

Unicorn (1923)

Unidentified (1596)

1596

NMR 876200

1596 wreck of cargo vessel thought to have been English, which stranded on the rocks at Plymouth Harbour during a
storm. Laden with tin, she was a wooden sailing vessel (2).

'About 12 o'clock, a ship belonging to a Mr Superave was cast away and lost on the harbour by reason of the great
storm, and another of the town lost at the same time. I hope to save the tin, because she came on the rocks on a full
sea.'

C.SP.Dom.1596; Letter, James Bragg, merchant and one-time mayor of Plymouth

Unidentified (2) (1599)

1599

NMR 876201

1599 wreck of a craft which may have stranded near Plymouth. She was a wooden sailing vessel (2).

C.SP.Dom.Eliz. 1599, vol.CCLXX, p148

Unidentified (3) (1604)

1604

Unidentified (4) (1628)

1628

Unidentified (5) (1628)

1628

Unidentified (6) (1637)

1637

Unidentified (7) (1666)

1666

Unidentified (8) (1666)

1666

Unidentified (9) (1675)

1675

Unidentified (10) (1689)

1689

Unidentified (11) (1668)

1668

Unidentified (12 (1804)

1804

Unidentified (13) (1744)

1744

Unidentified (14) (1746)

1746

Unidentified (15) (1757)

1757

Unidentified (16) (1757)

1757

Unidentified (18) (1760)

1760

Unidentified (19) (1764)

1764

Unidentified (20) (1766)

1766

Unidentified (21) (1767)

1767

Unidentified (22) (1768)

1768

Unidentified (23) (1771)

1771

Unidentified Barge (1786)

Location Description Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060187
Craft type Barge
Date of loss 4th January 1786
Manner of loss Wrecked
Tonnage 60

Unamed vessel lost in the gale between 3rd and 4th January 1786. "A barge, about 60 tons, and a large fishing vessel, destroyed." (1)

(1) Public Advertiser, London, England, 11 Jan 1786, Issue 16110

Unidentified Fishing Vessel (1786)

Location Description Plymouth
Reference NMR 1060187
Craft type Fishing Vessel
Date of loss 4th January 1786
Manner of loss Wrecked

See above reference

Unidentified (26) (1795)

1795

Unidentified (28) (1803)

1803

Unidentified (29) (1804)

1804

Unidentified (30) (1804)

1804

Unidentified (31) (1805)

1805

Unidentified (32) (1805)

1805

Unidentified (33) (1812)

1812

Unidentified (34) (1813)

1813

Unidentified (36) (1878)

1878

Unidentified (37) (1804)

1894

Unity (1689)

Location Description Mount Batten, Plymouth
Reference NMR 1449020
Date built 1672 Captured from Holland
Date of loss 27th December 1689
Manner of loss Driven Ashore
Outcome Wrecked
Construction Wood
Propulsion Sail
Nationality United Kingdom
Hull displacement 172 tonnes
Armament 4 cannon

 

'Plymouth, Decemb. 27. The 25th instant in the night there arose a very violent storm of wind at SW, blowing by gusts, and often shifting...At the same time went likewise from her anchors a Dutch man of war, called the UNITY, who falling foul upon the CENTURION frigat, they were both driven ashore and staved under Mount Batten within the Sound; of the former there were lost about 150, and of the later [sic] about 12 men.' (1)


NB: The name UNITY is clearly an English translation of the name. The Dutch version, EENDRACHT, attested from
other, contemporary, Dutch warships and merchantmen, is therefore given as the primary name of the vessel. It is
possible that this vessel is identifiable as the English fly-boat named the UNITY, which was originally captured from
the Dutch, and was given away about 1672, and was known to have been wrecked in the same storm; although the
description of the vessel in the present record as Dutch would appear to refer to a current nationality, and possibly,
therefore, not this vessel [NMR Note]

(1) London Gazette (London, England), December 30 1689 January 2 1690, Issue 2519, sourced from the British Library

Unity (1803)

1803

Unity (1806)

1806

Unity(1891)

1891

Valentine (1768)

1768

Valentine (1883)

1883

Vectis (1912) ...

(HMS) Vengeance (1766) ...

Venus (1891)

1891

Victory (1888)

1888

Viking Princess (1996) ...

Vine (1898)

1898

Volunteer (1896)

1896

Vrouw Johanna (1810)

1810

W Woollven (1925)

1925

Wager (1746)

1746

We Three (1934)

1934

Wesley (1873)

1873

Western Star (1873)

1873

White Horse (1889)

1889

Widgeon (1871)

1871

Wierkelyk (1781)

1781

William and Ann (1854)

1854

William Phillips (1884)

1884

Wilson (1812)

1812

Wk A Crabber (?)

Young Fanny (1809)

1809

Yvonne (1920) ...

Zeelust (1786)

Location Description Sutton Pool
Craft type Cargo Vessel
Date of loss 4th January 1786
Manner of loss Wrecked
Propulsion Sail
Departure port :Nantz (Nantes)
Destination port Amsterdam
Cargo Sugar, Prunes

Bound from Nantz (sp) with a cargo of sugar and prunes the Zee Lust was drove from her moorings and sunk during the gale that hit Plymouth between the 3rd and 4th January 1786 (1).

(1) Public Advertiser, London, England, 11 Jan 1786, Issue 16110

References

(A) Larn R. & Larn B., 1995, Shipwreck Index of the British Isles Vol. 1, Lloyds Register of Shipping, ISBN 0 900528 88 5
(B) Alan Salsbury, 2003, A History of the Plymouth Lifeboats, Halsgrove, ISBN 1 84114 275 1

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